Tech Field Day 15 Preview: Ixia

The Equifax hack raised a basic question. Don’t most Fortune 500 companies have some type of data loss protection (DLP) system in place to prevent such breaches. Or at least identify the breach before too much damage is done? You’d think that is the case after high-profile consumer data hacks such as Target occurred. The technologies to identify these intrusions remains ample. The operations discipline to utilize them remains immature. Next up on our Tech Field Day 15 previews is network virtualization and security company Ixia. 

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Techfield Day 15 Preview: DataCore

The Tech Field Day (TFD) presenter up next in my series of TFD 15 previews is DataCore. DataCore is a virtual SAN or hyperconverged solution. You may ask, why do we need yet another software-defined storage solution. VMware has come out with VSAN, aren’t we done? The simple fact is that there’s going to be opportunities for virtual SAN companies as long as there’s performance to be eked out of the underlying storage infrastructure. Or there are cost savings.

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Tech Field Day 15 Preview: Skyport Systems

We’ve heard the term zero-trust before. VMware has used it to describe the micro-segmentation that’s done using NSX. The idea in network micro-segmentation assumes no trust between systems based on location within the physical or logical network. Skyport Systems takes the concept to the extreme. In Skyports architecture, the network, application, computing, and user have no shared level of trust, other than zero-trust.

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Tread carefully before you lift and shift to the Cloud

I've talked about VMware Cloud (VMC) on AWS for a few weeks since the GA release during VMworld 2017. The solution is unique in that Amazon doesn't modify its data center design for any partner. VMC on AWS required the two companies to work together to make two very different data center designs work. The solution raises the question around lift and shift as a cloud migration strategy. 

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HPE, VMware, Cisco & Dell need to change the conversation

Coming off of DellEMC World, HPE Discover and Interop, I'm convinced that legacy IT infrastructure companies need a reset. Today, AWS and Google are having conversations directly with the consumers of technology. It's ironic that the theme of digital transformation is to remove friction in a business relationship. Shopping online is disrupts brick and mortar because online shopping removes friction. 

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Network as a Service provider TeloIP #NFD15

Are all Software-defined WAN (SD-WAN) solutions alike? With over 40 vendors in this space, I’d say that it’s likely not. Talking with The PacketPushers’ Greg Ferro on Twitter, he believes that many of these vendors will survive. While the space is fragmented, Ferro believes there’s room enough and market opportunity for most of the existing players to make a going concern of the SD-WAN business. It’s the question, of what makes one SD-WAN vendor different from another that I approach the follow-up to the TELoIP presentation at Network Field Day 15 (NFD15). 

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After HPE, VMware and Cisco, why should I trust Google Compute Engine?

The transition to a cloud service model is an arduous journey - whether from the customer or provider side. Going from a legacy IT vendor to a cloud-first vendor is as painful if not more so than moving your enterprise to a cloud-first delivery model. Recently HPE, VMware, and Cisco announced disruptive customer changes to their cloud strategies. It highlights why I frankly don’t trust Google for enterprise cloud. 

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25Gbps vs. 40Gbps Ethernet

Before Ethernet won the LAN wars between Ethernet and token ring, there was a legitimate debate of speed over architecture. In the 90’s, Ethernet moved from 10 Mbps to 100 Mbps while token ring moved from 8 Mbps to 16 Mbps. While a significant difference in speed, an argument of dedicated bandwidth in token ring vs. contention-based Ethernet was interesting. The industry settled on raw speed. There’s similar debate in today’s Ethernet. Customer needing speeds above 10 Gbps must make a decision on 25 Gbps vs. 40 Gbps. 

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AWS Snowball Edge doesn't compete with Nutanix but...

I made a hyperbolic statement on Twitter. I claimed that AWS’ Snowball Edge device was a direct competitor to Nutanix and other hyperconverged platforms. It’s Twitter. Tweets like mine are meant to generate conversation. It’s equivalent to clickbait. Of course, Snowball Edge isn’t a direct competitor to Nutanix and other HCI solutions. I further explained my position over on TechRepublic.com. However, Snowball edge strengthens Amazon’s position as a competitor to traditional IT including classic HCI. 

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